Wednesday, October 7, 2020

Boardgame - Adventure Games - Kosmos

Crossing that line (so be it)


  



Publisher:
Kosmos
Designers:
Matthew Dunstan, Phil Walker-Harding, Chihiro Mori
Artists:
Martin Hoffmann, Maximilian Schiller, Johanna Rupprecht, Folko Streese
Languages:
English, German, Dutch, French & more
# of Players:
1-4
Age:
12+ (more for some scenarios - I'd recommend 10+ for the tamer ones)
Duration:
270 min (broken into ~90 min chapters)

BoardGameGeek Reference:

Wait! Is this even an "Escape Room in a box"?

Fair question. One thing I've noticed in recent years is that the line between what is an "Escape Room", and what isn't, has become increasingly blurry, and that isn't really surprising. Most forms of entertainment go through phases where "standards" are established, followed by a phase in which those standards will be transformed and expanded. Game genres tend to pollinate one another all the time. When talking about the "origin" of Escape Rooms, for instance, you'll see folks saying that it all began in 2004, when Toshimitsu Takagi created a single-room puzzle adventure game in Flash. I've seen others say it began in 1988, when two brothers decided to use HyperCard for something it really wasn't meant to. Personally, I think if you're gonna go that far, you might as well say it all began in 1975, when a divorced computer programmer tried sharing his love of speleology with his daughters. Just another thing we can all "agree to disagree" on.

So anyway, I did not intent to review this series at first, especially since it doesn't even advertise itself as an escape-room-style game. However, I've seen many people regularly bring it up, and the fact it's got the exact same size that those EXIT boxes doesn't help... I ended up changing my mind for this particular game. I still don't expect to publish reviews for this, or this, or this, or this, or this...
Game Design & Mechanics

Sample game components

  • The game is primarily made of two decks of cards that (as always) you only reveal whenever you're asked to.
    • Location cards (they have different names in each game, but the idea's the same) are oversized cards identified by a single letter. As you explore the game setting, you'll be allowed to pick and place an increasing number of them on the table. Some cards might also end up replacing others, as things change in the game world.
    • Adventure cards are regular-sized, and typically bear a single number (although each game has special cards with other codes). Those cards can have all sorts of effects and instructions, but for the most part they'll show you an item you can now use.
    • The game will typically ask you to perform one of these 3 things: "Take card X from the deck" (if it's not there, just keep going), "Put card X back in the deck", and "Put card X back in the box" (meaning it's out of the game for good, whether it was still in the deck beforehand or not).
  • Before the game starts proper, each player will have to pick a character from the 4 offered. (If you're playing solo, you'll be asked to pick 2 and play for both.) Although they don't have any special stats per se, you'll find that they'll respond differently to some of the game events.
  • The final game component is the Adventure Book, a whole bunch of numbered paragraphs. I'll explain how this works below. There are also textual descriptions of every Location card. You must read those out loud the first time you enter a location, and can check them again whenever you like.
  • When it's your turn, you'll be allowed to 1) trade item cards with other characters in the same spot, 2) move to a different location, 3) perform one action at that location, and 4) trade items once again.
  • Rulebook example. By looking up entry 1015 in the Adventure Book,
    you'd be told to put card 10 in the box, then take card 12 from the deck.
  • The most basic action is to explore a specific area within a location. Those cards bear a bunch of 3-digit numbers, so your character can investigate every nook & cranny by reading the corresponding paragraph out loud.
  • Inventory objects can be combined one with another, by merging their two 2-digit numbers into a 4-digit one, and checking if a corresponding entry exists in the Adventure book.
  • Likewise, you can try to "use" any object in a location by merging the card's number with any of the 3-digit code, and look for a matching 5-digit entry in the Adventure book.
  • The Adventure Book can even be used to validate the occasional puzzle, as long as its answer is made of numbers.
  • Every game will have its own extra rules. For instance, "The Dungeon" has a "wounds" system, while "Monochrome Inc." has an "alarm level".
  • While each game can - of course - be played in one sitting, it's broken down into 3 chapters, making it easier to pause in-between. The game box even includes baggies you can use for storage.
  • The Kosmos app, available for iOS and Android, lets you enter paragraph numbers to have them read to you.
  • At the end of every chapter, you'll be awarding yourself points by following the game's instructions.
  • If stuck, there are some hints at the end of the rulebook. You can look up locations or card numbers in them.
Pros
  • The "paragraph book" mechanic works pretty well. I wish more games had it.
  • The way different characters will react differently to one-time events means that not every playthrough's the same.
  • There are multiple ways to solve some of the obstacles you'll encounter along the way.
  • Story-wise, the game plots have several interesting twists and turns.
Cons
  • Well, like I said at the very top, I wouldn't consider these to be Escape-Room-in-a-Box in the first place. Aside from the absence of time limit, the puzzles are majorly "inventory-based", like, well, computer adventure games (duh), and don't feel very escape-room-ish.
  • I'm not quite how to phrase this, but the game mechanics seem to be... counter-effective somewhat. I mean that this is game that should inherently be about searching every nook & cranny, but doing that will likely get you into trouble. This paradox seemed even more obvious in "Monochrome Inc.", where the difference between a smart move and a dumb one can really be subtle. 🤨
  • Depending on the order in which your perform some actions, the 3 chapters might not be of even length. I've had a 150-min one followed by a 45-min one.
  • The hints, too, are somewhat uneven. You can be told "combine this card with number X", but whether or not you'll be told how to obtain that second card seems a toss-up.

House Rules & Suggestions

To get the best gameplay experience, I suggest you do the following:
  • No turns
    Unless a special rule is currently in effect (you know, something like: "lose a life after every turn you play until..."), I wouldn't bother about having every single character play in sequence. Just pretend everyone else is "passing".
  • 3 characters minimum
    Having more characters allow you to make strategic decisions regarding who handles what. The game suggests picking 2 characters if you're playing alone, but I suggest picking 3. Likewise, you could add 1 or 2 characters to a 2-player game, which brings me to the next suggestion...
  • Assignments optional
    Unless your group of players really cares for sticking to one character each, you could even go one step further, by having the players go in turn, but have them pick any character they want to use during their turn. Leave those characters in front of their respective "owners", but let others borrow them on their turn.
  • Score-affecting hints
    If getting "free hints" seems wrong to you, just subtract 1 point from your final score for every "useful" pointer you got from the Hints section.

Currently Out (underline bold titles are those I've played)
  • The Dungeon (played with 4)
  • Monochrome Inc. (played alone)
  • The Volcanic Island

Thursday, October 1, 2020

The Witch's Forest - Daydream Adventures - Remote

"♫ I put a spell on you... "


If you're not familiar with my reviews, click here for some notes and definitions...
Room name:
The Witch's Forest
Location:
Daydream Adventures, Toronto (https://www.daydreamtoronto.com/)
# of Players:
1-8 (Played with 6)
Duration:
90 min
Multi-Room:
Yes
Interface & Controls:
Remote play (Zoom), Dedicated website, Inventory control
Language:
English
Hints:
Special (Delivered in person, by your in-game avatar)
Tally:
11 Locks, 24 Deductions, 17 Tasks
Official Description:
In a realm of dreams and magic, a trickster has upset the witch who lives here. Hilda has been away from the forest. Upon returning home, Hilda discovers someone has mischievously interrupted what she was working on. She is locked out of her cabin. She suspects a human may have done this, as she knows many humans detest her.
In this realm, spirits often watch and listen. Spirits of the forest, such as yourself, are very wise. A witch calls upon forest spirits for guidance. When Hilda calls for your help, your spirit can tell Hilda exactly how to undo the trickster’s mess.
Played in:
Fall 2020
Made it?
YES - With a little over 20 minutes left - no hint used
Verdict:
When I asked fellow enthusiast David (who had joined my Ottawa group last month) what he thought of Toronto's Daydream Adventures, his response was very positive. In fact, he said that "Dream Portal" was the best-looking room he'd seen in town so far. Well, lucky us - "The Witch's Forest" makes use of that game's set, but with a whole different, online-only adventure. Upon hearing the news, David asked he could join the group once again. Alright - the more the merrier, right? (Ironically, I had a cancellation later on, and ended up recruiting my buddy Fred to fill in.)
So yes, the room's gorgeous, of course - I think the picture makes it clear. But it's not only that. The theme and the provided video sequences give a whimsical feel to the whole experience, while our avatar did a great job at entertaining our adult-only group. I'm sure kids would have a great time there too, obviously. As for the puzzles, I'll admit they felt quite linear (I'd even say that players are "railroaded" through the whole game) but they did the job nonetheless. In fact, I didn't really notice that linearity until we were done, since I was having so much fun during the game. Nicely done!
Lessons Learned (or re-learned):


Photo de la salle réelle, tirée du site web
Actual room picture from their website


Si vous n'êtes pas un habitué de ce blog, cliquez ici pour quelques explications et définitions...
Nom de la salle:
The Witch's Forest
Emplacement:
Daydream Adventures, Toronto (https://www.daydreamtoronto.com/)
# de joueurs:
1-8 (jouée avec 6)
Durée:
90 min
Multiple:
Oui
Interface et contrôles:
Jeu à distance (Zoom), Site dédié, Gestion d'inventaire
Langue:
Anglais
Indices:
Spécial (Donnés en personne, par votre avatar dans le jeu)
Décomptes:
11 verrous, 24 déductions, 17 tâches
Description officielle:
(Voir version anglaise)
Jouée durant:
Automne 2020
Réussie?
OUI - Un peu plus de 20 minutes restantes - aucun indice utilisé
Verdict:
Quand j'ai demandé à David (accro notoire qui s'était joint à mon groupe d'Ottavien le mois dernier) ce qu'il pensait de l'entreprise torontoise Daydream Adventures, sa réponse fut très positive. En fait, il a affirmé que "Dream Portal" était la plus belle salle qu'il avait vue en dans toute la ville à date. Coup de chance - "The Witch's Forest" réutilise ces mêmes décors, mais pour créer une aventure complètement différente, offerte seulement en ligne. En l'apprenant, David m'a demandé s'il pourrait se joindre à nous une fois de plus. Parfait - plus on est de fous, plus on rit, non? (Ironiquement, j'ai eu une annulation par la suite, et ai dû recruter mon pote Fred pour compler une place.)
Alors donc oui, la salle est splendide, bien entendu - je crois que la photo le montre bien. Mais ce n'est pas que ça. Le thème, ainsi que les séquences vidéos incluses, donnent un ton très fantaisiste à toute l'expérience, et notre avatar a fait un excellent travail à divertir notre groupe composé d'adultes. Il est clair qu'un groupe incluant des plus jeunes aurait eu tout autant de plaisir, sinon plus. Pour ce qui est des énigmes, je dois admettre qu'elles étaient très linéaires (je dirais même que nous nous sommes sentis "sur des rails" durant le jeu tout entier), mais elles étaient tout de même adéquates. En fait, je n'ai pris pleinement conscience de la linéarité du jeu qu'une fois celui-ci terminé, tellement je m'amusais durant la partie. Bien joué!
Leçons à retenir (ou à réviser):

Friday, September 25, 2020

Exit Stage Left - CU Adventures in Time - Remote [Temporary]

"♫ Get the bow going! "


If you're not familiar with my reviews, click here for some notes and definitions...
Room name:
Exit Stage Left
Location:
Pygmalion, Urbana (Illinois) (https://thisispygmalion.com/exitstageleft/)
# of Players:
1-6 (Played with 5)
Duration:
30 min
Multi-Room:
Interface & Controls:
Remote play (Zoom)
Language:
English
Hints:
Special (Delivered in person, by your in-game avatar)
Tally:
6 Locks, 20 (!) Deductions, 16 Tasks
Official Description:
There’s been a disappearance, and you only have 30 minutes to solve the case! Exit Stage Left is a new live-action game that blends immersive theater and escape room style puzzles! In this exclusive Pygmalion performance, teams of up to 6 players will join a Zoom session to guide a pair of private detectives through a series of puzzles, traps, and other challenges.
Played in:
Fall 2020
Made it?
YES - With about 3 minutes left - no hint used
Verdict:
The introduction video
La vidéo d'introduction

I hadn't really heard about the Pygmalion Festival before this... and to be bluntly honest, I still feel like I know Jack Squat about it. 🤨 Really, I've looked around the web site, and clearly it's a festival, and it's in Illinois, and this year it went all-digital, like so many other events, but I still struggle to picture what the festival is about. Oh well.
I really had no idea what to expect, given that 1) it was a free-but-donations-welcome game, and 2) I only heard about this through some enthusiasts mentioning they had some open spots. I was in a for a pleasant surprise, though. The game was both fun, fast-paced, and original.
In the first part of the game (told you it was fast-paced), you would guide a detective entering the Station Theater, in search of his/her missing partner. Then, having found said partner, you have to guide him/her so that he/she escapes and solves the initial mission: finding Sudan Archives' stolen violin. The really interesting bit about that second part was that it was linear in a very literal sense: the avatar and the game camera would keep scrolling from one end to another, encountering puzzles along the way. I've been frustrated by some of the more "experimental" games in the past, but this one felt fun & fresh all the way through.
Lessons Learned (or re-learned):



Flavor pictures from their website
Photos thématiques tirées du site web


Si vous n'êtes pas un habitué de ce blog, cliquez ici pour quelques explications et définitions...
Nom de la salle:
Exit Stage Left
Emplacement:
Pygmalion, Urbana (Illinois) (https://thisispygmalion.com/exitstageleft/)
# de joueurs:
1-6 (jouée avec 5)
Durée:
30 min
Salles Multiples:
Interface et contrôles:
Jeu à distance (Zoom)
Langue:
Anglais
Indices:
Spécial (Donnés en personne, par votre avatar en jeu)
Décomptes:
6 verrous, 20 (!) déductions, 16 tâches
Description officielle:
(Voir version anglaise)
Jouée durant:
Automne 2020
Réussie?
OUI - Environ 3 minutes restantes - aucun indice utilisé
Verdict:
The game starts LITERALLY outside
Le jeu commence - littéralement - à l'extérieur

Je n'avais jamais entendu parler du festival Pygmalion avant ceci... et pour être tout à fait franc, j'ai encore l'impression de ne pas en avoir entendu parler. 🤨 Je le dis en toute candeur: j'ai visité le site web, et il s'agit clairement d'une sorte de festival, et c'est en Illinois, et cette année, comme bien d'autres, ils ont monté un événement 100% numérique, mais j'ai encore du mal à figurer ce qu'on y célèbre, au juste. Eh ben.
Je ne savais pas non plus à quoi m'attendre, puisque 1) ce jeu était gratuit-mais-les-dons-sont-bienvenus, et 2) je n'en avais entendu parler que par une poignée d'accros mentionnant qu'il leur restait des places. J'ai eu droit à belle surprise, finalement. Le jeu était amusant, dynamique, et original.
Dans la première partie du jeu (je vous l'ai dit, il s'y passe beaucoup de choses), vous deviez guider un(e) détective se rendant au Station Theater, à la recherche de son/sa partenaire disparu(e). Ensuite, après avoir trouvé le/la partenaire en question, vous alliez devoir le/la guider pour l'aider à s'échapper et à compléter sa mission d'origine: retrouve le violon volé de Sudan Archives. Ce que j'ai trouvé particulièrement intéressant avec cette seconde partie était qu'elle était linéaire au sens propre du terme: l'avatar, ainsi que la caméra de jeu, défilait d'un bout de la salle à l'autre, rencontrant des énigmes en cours de route. J'ai déjà été agacé par certains jeux plus "expérimentaux" dans le passé, mais celui-ci nous a semblé original et amusant du début à la fin.
Leçons à retenir (ou à réviser):

Wednesday, September 23, 2020

Éditorial: Objectif? Objection!

Asujetti à la subjectivité


Voilà un sujet de discussion qui ressort sur une base régulière, parfois comme un enjeu majeur, d'autres fois comme une discussion secondaire durant une conversation. Je l'ai vu surgir dans la communauté québécoise locale comme ailleurs dans le monde. J'en ai déjà parlé brièvement dans le passé, mais j'ai cru bon d'y revenir:

Les critiques de jeux d'évasion sont-ils objectifs?

Ma réponse habituelle à cette question ressemble à peu près à ça:
Huh?

J'essaie d'être objectif, ça va de soi, mais j'appartiens à l'espèce humaine, et je sais pas si vous avez remarqué, mais ces petites bêtes-là on tendance à être très subjectives dans leurs opinions.

Alors ouais, des tas de trucs peuvent influencer sur mon opinion globale d'une Escape Room, dans une direction ou l'autre. Peut-être que leur lobby est particulièrement beau. 👍 Peut-être qu'ils n'ont pas de stationnement. 👎 Peut-être que les proprios sont eux aussi des accros d'évasion, qui adorent en parler. 👍 Peut-être que mes enfants se sont disputés avant d'arriver. 👎 Peut-être que notre hôtesse est particulièrement jolie. 👍 Peut-être que j'ai faim/soif et n'ai pas pu rien trouver à manger/boire avant la partie. 👎 Peut-être que la salle a un thème que j'adore. 👍 Peut-être que j'ai récemment jouée une salle avec le même thème mais de meilleure qualité. 👎 Peut-être que notre hôte à fait une blague rigolote à propos de Dr. Who. 👍 Peut-être que j'ai mangé un truc que je ne digère pas. 👎 Peut-être que je joue avec des amis que je n'avais pas vu depuis un bout. 👍 Peut-être que la salle voisine est pleine de tapons avec un verre de trop dans le nez. 👎 Peut-être que je suis en vacances et que j'y ai déjà eu beaucoup de plaisir. 👍 Peut-être que ce thème ne me plaît tout simplement pas. 👎 Peut-être que je suis en feu et que j'ai résolu tout plein d'énigmes. 👍 Peut-être que notre hôte a dit un truc qui m'a fait sentir nono. 👎 Est-ce que j'ai déjà parlé de la jolie hôtesse? 😇🙄 👍 Peut-être que j'ai eu une mauvaise journée au travail. 👎 Peut-être que ma femme joue avec moi, et qu'elle a un look à me faire oublier toute jolie hôtesse susmentionnée. 😄😍 👍 Peut-être que j'ai dans mon groupe un ami qui s'avère être déplaisant. 👎

Au bout du compte, énormément de choses peuvent pousser votre opinion globale dans une direction ou l'autre, et même si certaines d'entre elles peuvent être dignes de mention (le manque de stationnement, le beau hall d'entrée...), elles ne devraient probablement pas faire partie de votre opinion générale d'une salle.

Alors donc... si quelqu'un m'offre de venir jouer à leur salle gratuitement, ou à rabais, est-ce que mon opinion en sera affectée? Fort probablement, dans une certaine mesure... mais honnêtement, je ne suis pas certain que ce soit nécessairement de manière positive - je pourrais me mettre à compenser dans l'autre direction, je crois bien. 🤷‍♂️ Et tant qu'à aborder le sujet...


Critique de théâtre, ou client mystère?


Plusieurs blogues de critiques de jeux d'évasion vont accepter - voire même demander, si ce n'est exiger (!) - des entrées subventionnées pour les salles dont ils vont parler. Je sais que certains des gens en train de me lire en sont scandalisés. Je crois pourtant que la chose demeure une question de point de vue.

Statler: "...et nous ne pourrons pas nous échapper avant."
Waldorf: "Tu veux dire qu'à toutes ces autres fois,
nous aurions pu simplement partir?
Prenons les critiques de théâtre. Ils reçoivent normalement des billets gratuits pour chaque spectacle en production. Leurs noms et leurs visages sont généralement bien connus, et les gens prennent leur opinion pour acquis, sachant qu'elles peuvent conduire à un succès ou un échec commercial.

Pourtant, la comparaison est faible quand on y pense bien. La "performance" offerte aux critiques fait partie d'un ensemble. Pouvez-vous imaginez si, au lieu d'une "première médiatique", les spectacles devaient faire une représentation pour chaque critique? Et même si, oui, on peut argumenter que les spectacles, comme les jeux d'évasion, peuvent être victimes de pépins techniques ou d'erreurs humaines, ceux-ci risquent beaucoup moins d'affecter l'intégralité de votre expérience de spectateur.

Une autre manière dont l'analogie ne tient pas la route est la façon dont les propriétaires peuvent offrir une expérience de jeu significativement meilleure aux critiques qu'aux clients réguliers, simplement en prenant davantage soin d'eux. Pouvez-vous imaginer si, après la publication des critiques, un spectacle de Broadway remplaçait tous ses artistes par une troupe d'amateurs?

"...et une eau minérale!"
L'Aile ou la Cuisse (1976)
On pourrait faire une comparaison plus étroite entre les critiques de jeux d'évasion et les critiques gastronomiques, en particulier ceux qui visitent les restaurants de manière anonyme. Ainsi, vous pouvez vivre une expérience se rapprochant davantage de celle de monsieur-madame-tout-le-monde. Vous débarquez discrètement, faites comme si de rien n'était, quelques questions, et c'est reparti. Une belle analogie, pas vrai?

Pourtant, elle n'est pas si parfaite, à mon avis. Imaginez: et si une visite au restaurant était la seule manière d'obtenir un repas? L'unique façon de régler vos "envies gastronomiques" serait donc d'aller encore et toujours dans les mêmes restaurants, ce qui signifierait 1) qu'on finirait par vous reconnaître, et 2) que vous finiriez par devenir un "habitué", donc par probablement recevoir un traitement spécial de toute manière. Et ensuite quoi? Vous donneriez un faux nom au moment de réserver? Vous porteriez un déguisement?


Comment ça se passe ici (on se la met sur la table)


Je l'ai déjà mentionné, sur ce blog et ailleurs: bien que je n'aie rien contre l'approche "critique théâtrale", j'ai personnellement tendance à prendre celle du "client mystère", en évitant de mentionner le blog et en n'essayant pas de rejoindre les propriétaires (surtout ceux que je ne connais pas déjà) avant de faire mes réservations. Ceci étant dit, les propriétaires qui me connaissent peuvent assurément m'offrir des rabais, ne serait-ce que pour augmenter les chances que je vienne voir leurs salles plus rapidement. C'est ça qui est ça.

N'empêche, cette réponse ne suffira peut-être pas à tous. Peut-être vous demandez-vous à quel point exactement l'aspect pécunier a pu me "corrompre". Alors vous savez quoi? Je vais le dire. 😲

Sur les 200 premiers jeux que j'ai fait, 35 portent l'étiquette "specialrebate". Toutefois, la plupart d'entre eux viennent de compensation pour des choses qui n'ont pas été rondement, ou des concours que j'ai gagnés, ou d'autres circonstances que je ne crois pas être en rapport direct avec le blog. (Croyez-le ou non, y'a des gens ici-bas qui trouvent mes enfants attachants 🤨, et ça m'a déjà valu un rabais ou deux. Tout bien considéré, je compte 15 jeux pour lesquels j'ai reçu un rabais qui m'était spécifiquement offert dû à l'existence du blog. En faisant le calcul, ces offres m'ont épargné environ 500 dollars au fil des ans. Là, vous pouvez-vous dire que c'est un très bon "deal", tout ça... 🤑 ...mais suite à mes calculs, je conclus aussi avoir passé environ 500 heures sur le blog jusqu'à ce même point. Autrement dit, j'aurais pu investir ces heures à faire à peu près n'importe quel travail, et le résultat aurait été plus lucratif. 😅


On continue? ("♫ Stop... ou... Encore... ")


J'aime bien faire des listes. Et des compilations. Alors après avoir essayé quelques jeux d'évasion, j'ai mentalement gardé une poignée de notes, que j'ai utilisées pour faire un genre "d'album", qui est ensuite devenu un blogue, et ce longtemps avant même que je ne le publicise sur les réseaux sociaux. J'ai laissé quelques amis y jeter un oeil, et l'un d'eux m'a fait remarquer que ce serait bien d'avoir "un petit quelque chose en plus" que de simplement énumérer les salles et mes impressions générales. J'ai donc ajouté le concept des "Leçons à Retenir", puis j'ai ajouté des critiques de jeux sur table.

Parallèlement à tout ça, j'ai mis sur pied mes cartes et mes bottins, les améliorant petit à petit. Dans les dernières années, par contre, j'ai de la compétition, comme je le faisais récemment remarquer, et j'en suis à me demander si je devrais m'y remettre, ou bien plutôt investir mes efforts ailleurs. Honnêtement, j'ai pas encore fini de me le demander. 😛

Je sais bien que je ne ferai pas brailler personne ici, mais je dois le dire... tenir un blog, surtout avec les contraintes que je me suis donné (un article pour chaque jeu / salle), ben c'est vraiment fatiguant. En toute franchise, il y a des jours où je me demande si je ne suis pas simplement victime d'un "biais d'engagement". Je ne crois pas que ce soit vraiment le cas - je retire quand même du plaisir de ce que je fais, après tout. N'empêche, j'espère que je mets les bons efforts aux bons endroits.
Mais toi, très cher lecteur, tu en penses quoi? Si tu t'es rendu jusqu'ici, y a-t-il des amélioration que tu souhaiterais voir? Une refonte de la mise en page? Une nouvelle fonctionnalité? Je ne reçois pas beaucoup de "feedback" en général, et je serais heureux de savoir ce qui ne fonctionne peut-être pas aussi bien que je pourrais le croire. En tout cas, merci d'être là! 😉

Thoughts: Objectively Subjective

Subject to Subjectiveness


Here's a topic that turns up regularly, either as a side discussion during a chat, or as recurring argument. I've seen it pop up in our local Quebec community as well as on the larger scene. I briefly touched it in the past, but let's give it another go:

Are Escape Room reviewers / bloggers objective?

My typical response to that question is...
Muh?

I try to be objective, of course, but I'm a human being, and those annoying little things are quite the subjective lot.

So yeah, tons of things could sway my overall opinion of a room, either way. Maybe they have nice lobby. 👍 Maybe they don't have parking. 👎 Maybe the owners are fellow enthusiasts who love to chat. 👍 Maybe the kids got in a fight on our way there. 👎 Maybe the gamemaster is an attractive lady. 👍 Maybe I couldn't get a quick snack or drink before the game. 👎 Maybe I really love that room's theme. 👍 Maybe I recently played a better room with the same theme. 👎 Maybe the GM made a Doctor Who joke I liked. 👍 Maybe I ate something bad before the game. 👎 Maybe I'm playing with friends I haven't seen in a while. 👍 Maybe there's a group of loud drunken idiots in the next room. 👎 Maybe I'm on vacation and having a great time already. 👍 Maybe I just don't like that theme. 👎 Maybe I was really clever and solved a ton of stuff. 👍 Maybe the host said something that me feel dumb. 👎 Did I mention the attractive GM already? 😇🙄 👍 Maybe I had a bad day at work. 👎 Maybe my wife is playing with me, with that cute dress that'll make me forget any aforementioned attractive GM. 😄😍 👍 Maybe I brought a friend who doesn't "play nice". 👎

Ultimately, lots of things can steer your opinion one way or the other, and while some of them could be legitimate things to observe in a review (the lack of parking, the nice-looking lobby...), they probably should be left out when making your overall assessment of an escape room.

So... If someone asks me to come play their room for free, or with a rebate, will it impact my judgment? Well, probably, to some extent... but honestly, I'm not sure if that impact will be positive - I might feel a need to overcompensate, really. 🤷‍

Speaking of which...


Theater Critic, or Mystery Diner?


Many ER review blogs out there will accept - even request, if not require (!) - subsidized tickets for the rooms they review. I know some readers do take offense in that. I think it comes down as a matter of point of view, however.

Statler: "...and we won't be able to escape until then."
Waldorf: "Wait - you mean all those other times,
we could've just left?
Take theater critics. They will typically get free tickets to every show there is out there. Their names and faces are generally well-known, and people just take for granted that their opinions on a show will make or break it, right?

However, it's a pretty weak analogy when you scratch below the surface. The "performance" given to critics is part of a larger whole. Can you imagine if, instead of a single "media premiere", shows had to run one performance for every critic? And yes, you could argue that shows, just like Escape Rooms, can fall prey to technical problems or human errors, but those are a lot less likely to completely sour your experience as a viewer.

Another area where the analogy doesn't hold is that owners can provide a significantly better experience to critics than to regular customers, simplify by pampering more to them, and providing better customer service. Can you imagine if, after all the reviews got published, a Broadway show replaced all its top-billing performers with third-grade nobodies?

"...and one mineral water!"
L'Aile ou la Cuisse (1976)
A closer comparison could be made between ER critics and food critics, especially those who visiting restaurants anonymously. That way, you can get an experience very similar to what the "everyday man" will go through. Come in, be innocuous, ask a few questions, and out you go. Seems like a great analogy, doesn't it?

Well, it's still far from perfect, in my mind. Picture this: what if going to restaurants was the only way to get a decent meal? So to get your "gastronomical fix", you have no choice but to go to restaurants again and again, meaning that 1) you're bound to be recognized eventually, and 2) you might still end up with better treatment since you're a regular. And then what? You'll change your name when you call ahead? Wear a disguise?


How I roll - Spilling the beans


I've mentioned this in the past, on this blog and elsewhere: while having no qualms against my fellow "theater-style" critics, I personally do lean more towards the "mystery diner" type, avoiding mentions of the blog and not trying to reach owners (especially those I don't know) before booking my rooms. That being said, owners who do know of me are more than welcome to offer me deals, if only to ensure I get to play their rooms faster. No biggie.

Still, that might not be enough for some of you. Perhaps you're wondering precisely how "corrupt" I might have become by the monetary angle. So you know what? I'll tell. 😲

Out of the 200 first games I played, 35 bear the "specialrebate" label. Most of those, however, are compensations for things that didn't go right, or contest prizes I won, or circumstantial deals that I do not believe to be related to the blog. (Believe it or not, some folks out there find my kids endearing, and I got a few rebates out of that, too.) All things considered, there are 15 games for which I clearly was offered a deal specifically because of the blog. By my calculations, those deals saved me about 500 dollars over the years. Now, you might be thinking that's a pretty good deal to have... 🤑 ...but by those same calculations, I've spent roughly 500 hours on the blog so far. 🤨 In other words, spending those hours working on pretty much any sort of work would've been more lucrative. 😅


And now what? ("♫ Keep... on... movin'... ")


I like lists. And summaries. When I started playing Escape Rooms, I took a few mental notes, then I turned those into an "album" of sorts, and then it became a blog - long before I even publicized it on social networks. I had a couple friends look at it, and one of them pointed out that it'd be nice to have "a little something extra" than just listing rooms and general impressions. I then came up with the idea of "Lessons Learned", to which I added book & boardgame reviews.

In parallel, I built my maps and directories, gradually improving on them. In recent years, though, competition has ramped up, as I said in previous posts, and I've been wondering whether I should work on further improvements, or put my efforts elsewhere. Honestly, I'm not done wondering just yet. 😛

I know I won't get anyone teary-eyed for my sake, but I have to say... writing up a blog, especially with the parameters I chose to give myself (every game / room warrants its own article), is a fairly tiresome task. Frankly, there are times where I wonder if this is just a case of sunk-cost fallacy. I don't think so - I do get a measure of enjoyment from what i do here, after all. But I hope to put the rights efforts in the right places.
But what about you, dear reader? If you made it all the way here, are there improvements you'd like to see here? A revamp of the layout? Some missing feature? I don't get much feedback, and I'd love to know what may or may not work as well as I think. In the meantime, thanks for just being here! 😉

Sunday, September 20, 2020

Seabed - YouEscape - Remote

"♫ Under the seeeeeeea... "


If you're not familiar with my reviews, click here for some notes and definitions...
Room name:
Seabed
Location:
YouEscape, Athens (Greece) (https://www.patreon.com/youescape/posts)
# of Players:
Unlimited (2-4 recommended) (Played with 4)
Duration:
60 min
Multi-Room:
Interface & Controls:
Remote play (Google Hangouts), Shared documents (Google Drive), Webcrumbs
Language:
English
Hints:
2 (Delivered in person, by our host)
Tally:
2 Locks, 15 Deductions, 13 Tasks
Official Description:
You are an avid treasure hunter in search of the world’s rarest underwater mineral. However you’ve spent a considerable amount of time and resources to no avail... You decide to give it one more go before giving up.
Played in:
Summer 2020
Made it?
YES - With about 30 minutes left - no hint used
Verdict:
For this second YouEscape in the same month, we were slightly constrained by time. While the game had a 60-min limit, we actually had to be done in 50 minutes, so that one of my teammates wouldn't be late to an appointment. Not to sound cocky, but we thought that this shouldn't much of a challenge, given our recent performances.
Unfortunately, this was also the time Nick made a mistake and assumed our game was later that day. Once we pinged him, he promptly got ready for us, but now we only had about 35 minutes to finish this game with a full crew. Would we make it?
Well, we stepped on the gas, cut down on our usual jokes, did away with the long explanations whenever one of us fell behind (who, me? 😅), and managed to wrap the whole thing with a few minutes to spare. Too bad we couldn't take our time to fully enjoy those puzzles. As always, there were many clever touches here and there. This time, the "ultimate task" was to pick the right area of the shown aquarium to dig down into. 🙂 Original, as we'd expect.
Lessons Learned (or re-learned):


Photo du jeu réel, tirée du descriptif
Actual game picture from the official blurb


Si vous n'êtes pas un habitué de ce blog, cliquez ici pour quelques explications et définitions...
Nom de la salle:
Seabed
Emplacement:
YouEscape, Athènes (Grèce) (https://www.patreon.com/youescape/posts)
# de joueurs:
Illimité (2-4 recommandés) (jouée avec 4)
Durée:
60 min
Salles Multiples:
Interface et contrôles:
Jeu à distance (Google Hangouts), Documents partagés (Google Drive), Piste web
Langue:
Anglais
Indices:
2 (Donnés en personne, par notre hôte)
Décomptes:
2 verrous, 15 déductions, 13 tâches
Description officielle:
(Voir version anglaise)
Jouée durant:
Été 2020
Réussie?
OUI - Environ 30 minutes restantes - aucun indice utilisé
Verdict:
Pour cette seconde session de YouEscape dans un même mois, nous étions légèrement restreint dans le temps. Même si le jeu avait une limite d'une heure, nous allions devoir le compléter en 50 minutes, pour éviter qu'un membre de notre équipe ne soit en retard à un rendez-vous. Sans vouloir paraître trop fanfarons, nous nous sommes dit que ce serait chose facile, au vu de nos récentes performances.
Malheureusement, cette fois était aussi celle où Nick a commis une erreur dans son horaire, croyant que nous devions jouer plus tard. Après l'avoir contacté, il s'est empressé de tout mettre en place, mais le résultat était que nous n'avions plus que 35 minutes pour compléter le jeu avec l'équipe entière. Allions-nous y parvenir?
Et bien, nous avons augmenté la cadence, retenu nos habituelles blagues, avons laissé tomber les moments où un joueur n'ayant pas compris (qui, moi? 😅) se fait tout expliquer en détail, et avons ainsi pu terminer le jeu avec encore quelques minutes en bonus. Dommage que nous n'ayons pas pu prendre de le temps de pleinement apprécier toutes ces énigmes. Comme toujours, il avait quelques très bonnes idées ici et là. Cette fois, la "tâche ultime" consistait à choisir la bonne section de l'aquarium dans laquelle creuser. 🙂 Original, comme à chaque fois.
Leçons à retenir (ou à réviser):

L'état initial du jeu
The game initial state

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

Jeux de table - The Network - The Escapement

La Valeur Nette


Image tirée du site officiel


Éditeur:
Concepteurs:
The Escapement
Artiste:
Aucun?
Langues:
Anglais
# of Players:
1-6 (je recommande 3-4)
Âge:
14 ans et + (dû à quelques scènes violentes)
Duration:
? (je dirais 3 à 6 heures)

Concepts et mécaniques de jeu

Quelques éléments du jeu

  • Pour ceux qui l'ignorent, The Escapement est une entreprise de jeux d'évasion située à Margate, en Angleterre. Il se trouve que je l'ai visitée en 2019, durant nos vacances familiales, et nous y avons passé un très bon moment.
  • La première chose que vous trouverez dans cette boîte mystérieuse est une lettre provenant de la "Division des Circonstances Intéressantes" d'une organisation secrète britannique nommée "The Network". Leur sécurité est compromise, et ils ont décidé d'aller chercher de l'aide là ou personne ne s'y attendrait, soit: chez vous. 😄 Cette même lettre vous guidera vers le site web de l'organisation.
  • Presque tout le contenu de la boîte est réparti entre 3 grosses enveloppes, que vous ne devrez ouvrir que lorsque l'on vous le dira.
  • Tel que vous le demandera la séquence vidéo initiale, vous allez ouvrir une première enveloppe, trouver comment en soutirer un code, entrer ledit code sur le site web, ce qui vous mènera à la séquence vidéo suivante, et ainsi de suite.
  • À chaque étape, vous pourrez utiliser le bouton de "Support à distance", dans le coin, pour "ouvrir un ticket de support" et demander des indices automatisés sur la section courante.
  • La boîte est conçue pour être à usage unique, avec des composantes à endommager et quelques trucs sur lesquels vous êtes sensé écrire.

Le portail web de l'ICD

Pour
  • L'aspect visuel global est très élégant, très moderne. Nous sommes loin des couleurs criardes de Unlock! Les séquences vidéo sont - elles aussi - bien réalisées.
  • La qualité des composantes est elle aussi très élevée. Rien à voir avec les "boîtes par abonnement" typiques.
  • Les énigmes sont plutôt variées. Chacune des trois enveloppes peut donner l'impression d'appartenir à un jeu différent.
Contre
  • Le coût de la boîte est problématique, en particulier pour nous canadiens. Si vous habitez au Royame-Uni, recevoir cette boîte vous coûtera à peu près l'équivalent d'une paire de boîtes de Unlock! Même en partageant les coûts d'envoi avec quelques amis, la même boîte m'a plutôt coûté l'équivalent de trois jeux semblables. Difficile pour moi d'affirmer que ce jeu offre vraiment plus de divertissement que neuf parties de Unlock!
  • À la lumière du point précédent, le fait que la boîte n'est sensée ne servir qu'une seule fois est encore plus difficile à digérer. (Ceci étant dit, j'ai été prudent avec les éléments du jeu et je crois que je pourrais y faire jouer d'autres personnes, même si une ou deux énigmes ne seraient pas aussi agréables à faire.)
  • Même si la chose ne nous est pas arrivée, je pourrais facilement imaginer que des joueurs se retrouvent coincés malgré le système d'aide - les indices ne sont jamais explicites, et on pourrait aisément mal interpréter un des conseils donnés...
Les suggestions de la maison

Pour une meilleure expérience de jeu, je vous suggère ceci:
  • Jouez sur plusieurs sessions...
    Les trois enveloppes peuvent aisément se jouer sur 3 sessions différentes. (Et puis, comme je le disais ci-dessus, on pourrait croire à 3 jeux distincts de toute manière.)
  • ...mais gardez vos notes
    Votre fureteur risque de ne pas mémoriser le point où vous étiez rendus, alors il vous faudra possiblement taper vos anciens codes de nouveau.